Call of Duty Mobile Microtransactions Have Gone Entirely Too Far


by in Call of Duty Mobile | Sep, 21st 2020

Since the launch of Call of Duty Mobile, there have been microtransactions. And why not? It’s a free-to-play game, after all. We understand that your game has to make money; otherwise, you can’t run it. We get it, it makes sense, but it sounds like Call of Duty Mobile has gone a bridge too far. The community is furious about the state of the microtransactions in a game that is otherwise enjoyable to play.

Microtransactions aren’t even new to the franchise. Personally, this writer was furious at the ones that appeared in Call of Duty WWII, but that’s just how it is. At least the most current Call of Duty has a more friendly microtransaction model than the Advanced Warfare crates, which felt like gambling.

What’s Going On?


A PC and console player can buy what they want? After something in particular, that’s not how it works on mobile. It’s entirely RNG. You have to gamble and hope you get what you want.

Resperas on Reddit broke it down pretty sufficiently when it comes down to bundles: “If you look at the Mace bundle in Call of Duty Modern Warfare, it’s sold at 2,400 CP, which equates to $20. The contents inside this bundle holds three legendary items and seven epic items, 10 items all together for $20. Then compare that to the “Desert Survival” bundle found in Call of Duty Mobile, priced at 1,100 CP, which equates to between $10-$15. The contents inside this specific bundle hold just two epic bundles and a battlepass tier.”

The luck-based crates that mainline console/PC iterations did away with are very much here on the mobile. If you want a particular gun in Call of Duty Mobile, prepare to spend hundreds of dollars in microtransactions. We understand it probably takes more to get people spending money again and again in a free-to-play game, but this feels predatory.

Sure, the crates should have an epic in them, but it’s still wildly random. You spend 1,080 CP ($10-15) for 10 crates. All you can do is hope and pray you get the item(s) you want. Do you want to know the odds of that happening? Spoiler warning: It’s not very high.

Resperas also discusses the Lucky Draws: “Again, if you compare this to the Mace bundle found in MW, you’re paying between $10K-$12K for legendary draws, which equates to over $100, and the draws are highly randomized. Yes, there are folks that get the legendary weapon in under 3 draws, but the system is designed to have players pay for the entire lucky draw. A compromise I’m willing to discuss is making the draw into a premium tier bundle sold between $60-$80.”

This doesn’t sound that shocking, unfortunately. There are so many gacha games that this writer has enjoyed (DBZ: Dokkan Battle, Brave Frontier, etc.), and all have Lucky Draws/random drops you spend real money on.

We’ve seen several videos of people spending $200-$300 on loot crates in Call of Duty Mobile, only to get a pair of rare skins and three rare guns, and that is horrifying. It’s predatory, it’s disgusting, and the community seems like they’re fed up with it.

The luck-based system may be popular on mobile games, but the Call of Duty community is used to those things being gone, except on mobile, that is. The need for change is very real. While Call of Duty Mobile is enjoyable, the microtransactions are rubbish.

Now, loot crates don’t have to be eradicated. Smaller loot boxes may be reasonable (10-15 items instead of hundreds possibly), or you could keep them in for those who rely on freebies. That way, people can still roll those and get random items. Players spending real money don’t feel like they’re being ripped off. It’s legalized gambling, and the Call of Duty devs are taking advantage of the players with these predatory microtransactions.

It has to change fast. These kinds of free-to-play games with dangerous microtransactions lead to pretty irresponsible decisions. It’s our hope the developers decide to be transparent and reach out to their community. It could very well hurt them in the long run, if this keeps up.

Comments


Leave a Reply